Lyon County Public Health

The Emporia Gazette

Lyon County Public Health updated the county’s isolation and quarantine guidance, Thursday afternoon, following recent changes by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for health care workers in a hospital setting and the general public.

“Lyon County Public Health has been working with KDHE to update the quarantine and isolation guidelines for the county to better align them with the CDC’s recommendations,” said Jennifer Millbern, Public Health Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, in a written release. “Research has shown that most people are most contagious at the beginning of their infection or first few days of their infection. However, people can still be contagious up to day 10, so it is important to wear masks for the entire 10 days. “

Health Care Workers in a Hospital Setting

The guidance said health care workers with lab confirmed COVID-19 infections should isolate for 10 days — or 7 days with negative test, if asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (with improving symptoms).

Health care contingency or crisis workers with COVID-19 who are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic can return to work only with COVID-19 positive patients during the remainder of the 10-day infectious period.

Boosted and asymptomatic health care workers who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection have no work restrictions with negative test on days 2 and 5-7.

Not boosted and unvaccinated asymptomatic health care workers who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection must quarantine for 10 days — or 7 days with a negative test.

General Population

The general population, which does not include people who work in a health care setting or other congregate setting, should get a test and stay home if they develop symptoms.

People with lab confirmed COVID-19 infections, regardless of vaccination status should stay home for 5 days. If you have no symptoms or your symptoms are resolving after 5 days and you are fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever reducing medications, you can leave your house. Individuals should continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days.

Boosted or fully vaccinated individuals who have completed the primary series of recommended vaccine, but have not received a recommended booster shot when eligible who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection do not have to stay home and should wear a mask around others for 10 days. If possible, individuals should get tested on day 5.

People who are unvaccinated OR have completed the primary series of recommended vaccine, but have not received a recommended booster shot when eligible who are close contacts of a person with confirmed COVID-19 infection should stay home for 5 days. After that continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days. If unable to quarantine, individuals must wear a mask for 10 days. If possible, individuals should get tested on day 5.

Additional information can be found at www.publichealth.lyoncounty.org

Complete updated isolation and quarantine guidelines can be found at https://publichealth.lyoncounty.org/quarantine-guidelines.

(8) comments

Elrod

I’m sure we’ve all known people who had caught the virus more than once plus we’ve known people who’ve had the vaccine plus the booster and still have caught it. I think we also know that if you’ve been vaccines and boosters and also had a virus that you were very likely to had a mild case or might not even even known. My concern is that their laxing the protocols about quarantining and I think that’s a mistake shorting it to five days I believe is a mistake we all know there are people that will totally ignore protocols which is very foolish . That’s why I’m not thrilled with what they’ve done.

user75

Since when did science stop recognizing or acknowledging natural immunity?

Aim_High

Probably when science recognized unvaccinated adults who were previously infected with covid were much more likely to be reinfected than vaccinated adults who were previously infected... Natural immunity probably does work for some people for some amount of time, but there's no guarantee the infected person still has antibodies and will prevent reinfection.

Everyones body is different. Some of our bodies are great and creating and retaining antibodies and some of our bodies suck at making antibodies and suck at retaining them. The only real way to know if you have any protection is to either get vaccinated or have an antibody test done. There is no "natural immunity" that is a one size fits all...

I personally know a lot of people who have had covid twice... if natural immunity was so effective, that wouldn't be the case.

user75

Agreed everyone’s body is different, I know some vaccinated that have had covid twice, likewise if the vaccine works so well that would not be the case. Natural immunity should be recognized as well.

Aim_High

If we both know people who've gotten covid twice, natural immunity shouldn't even be part of the conversation.

Rationa1

There is no "natural immunity," 75. What you are calling "natural" immunity is the presence of antibodies built by surviving COVID-19. This is a novel coronavirus, so no person on earth had immunity in any form prior to suffering the disease. Research determined these antibodies are less effective at preventing reinfection than antibodies created through vaccination.

Reinfection is not evidence that vaccines "don't work so well." On the other hand, data gathered by the CDC indicates that persons who are unvaccinated are 6 times more likely to contract COVID-19, 9 times more likely to be hospitalized, and 14 times more likely to die than persons who are vaccinated. THAT data is strong evidence that "the vaccine works so well."

Elrod

It’s like the flavor of the week at Baskin-Robbins. Just hold your breath for a little while and they change it again.

Rationa1

Nonsense. It's like, when something is new and we don't know much about it we set guidelines based on what we know. As we gain more experience with it and understand it better, we revise those guidelines based on what we have learned.

Surely you try new things, gain experience, and get better understanding as you have more experience, Elrod. So why do you expect science and scientists to understand a new disease perfectly the first time they encounter it?

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